Book Review: How People Change

How People Change by Timothy S. Lane and Paul David Tripp (Greensboro: New Growth Press, 2006. 255 pp) Timothy S. Lane and Paul David Tripp are counselors and faculty members at the Christian Counseling & Educational Foundation in Glendale, Pa. and lecturers in practical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. Give It 50 Pages Nancy Pearl isn’t the only one with this argument, but I heard it from her first so she’s getting credit. Statistically speaking, there are more books in the world than any one person could ever read in a lifetime. Your reading time is sacred and finite. Pearl, thus, urges her followers to avoid reading books they find unrewarding. Give a book 50 pages; if it doesn’t grip… Read More →

Album Review: The Heist

The Heist by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis (Macklemore LLC, 2012. 61 minutes) Macklemore is the moniker for Seattle-based rapper, Ben Haggerty. Macklemore has worked closely with his producer, Ryan Lewis, to release 2 full length albums and 3 EPs. Macklemore’s latest album, The Heist, debuted at number 2 on the Billboard 200. Call Me Never Never a big fan of Top 40 radio, you can often hear snarky comments and extensive criticism from me whenever the radio is on. Most often, my critique falls sharply on menial lyrics. The songwriters behind the biggest hits know how to write music. Sadly, they also realize the average listener requires no challenge from the lyrics. Take, for example, the current hit, “Call Me… Read More →

Album Review: Old World Romance

Old World Romance by Sea Wolf (Dangerbird Records, 2012. 32 minutes) Sea Wolf is an indie folk band fronted by Alex Church. It began as a side project for Church but morphed into a full-fledged band. They signed to Dangerbird Records in 2007. Sea Wolf’s first record, Leaves in the River, hit #24 on the Billboard Heatseeker’s Chart. We All Believe in Something Some people have faith in a higher power; they see absurdly complex entities and conclude a higher power is in control. Some people believe in an emotional state. They meet their one true love and they know, without a shadow of doubt, wedding bells will soon follow. Some people have faith in reason. They read the latest… Read More →

Book Review: A Whole New Mind

A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age by Daniel H. Pink (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005. 288 pp) An author of 4 books on the changing world of work, Daniel Pink earned his B.A. from Northwestern University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. In 2011, Thinkers50 ranked Pink one of the 50 most influential business thinkers in the world. He lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and three children. How Then Shall We Work? It seems all parents urge their children to earn a marketable degree. Even though evidence exists which confirms the importance of a college degree of any kind helping workers earn more over the average lifespan, parents want a… Read More →

Album Review: Synthetica

Synthetica by Metric (MMI, Crystal Math Music Group, and Mom + Pop Music, 2012. 43 minutes) Metric is a Canadian new wave and post-punk revival band consisting of Emily Haines (vocals), Jimmy Shaw (guitar), Joshua Winstead (bass), and Joules Scott Key (drums). Metric’s previous release, Fantasies, won “Album of the Year” and contributed to Metric earning, “Band of the Year” at the 2010 Juno Awards. Metric’s music has been featured in Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. Job Search Ruminations In the last year, I spent some time unemployed. I must say, it is a position I do not wish on anyone. Countless resumes drifted into the void of hiring manager’s recycling bins. It always seemed… Read More →

Book Review: Shop Class as Soulcraft

Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work by Matthew B. Crawford (New York: The Penguin Press, 2009. 256 pp) Matthew B. Crawford is a philosopher and mechanic. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from the University of Chicago and served as a postdoctoral fellow on its Committee on Social Thought. Currently a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia, he owns and operates Shockoe Moto, an independent motorcycle repair shop in Richmond, Virginia. An Apple Nowhere Near the Tree They say the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree. Whether it’s culinary taste, similar joys in sports, or comparable career paths, parents and children often resemble each… Read More →

Book Review: Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys

Useless Landscape, or a Guide for Boys: Poems by D. A. Powell (Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2012. 110 pp) D. A. Powell is the author of five collections of poetry, including the trilogy of Tea, Lunch, and Cocktails, and Chronic, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. He has twice been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry. He lives in San Francisco. The Who Who are you? The defining characteristics of each person are often both varied and unusual. As humans we can all claim similar traits. We love; we laugh; we live; we die. Externally, we even define ourselves through the region in which we live. I am a Seattleite; I am Cascadian. My region… Read More →

Television Show Review: Doctor Who: Series 7

The Critical Importance of Relationship In my latest contribution to Fieldnotes Magazine, I explore the latest series of Doctor Who. Series 7, which began in September 2012 and will run through Spring 2013 highlights the increasing tension between The Doctor (Matt Smith) and his companions, Amy Pond (Karen Gilian) and Rory Williams (Arthur Darvill). In my article, I link this tension to the importance of relationship and the theological principle of being made in the image of God. “One principle becomes clear: The Doctor is alone—and his solitude has influenced his judgment. There’s much to learn much from this atrabilious narrative. Relationship is crucial to a leader’s decision making process (even if that leader is a Time Lord).” So meander over to Fieldnotes Magazine… Read More →

Book Review: The Supper of the Lamb

The Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection by Robert Farrar Capon; edited by Ruth Reichl (New York: The Modern Library, 2002; originally published in 1967. 320 pp) Robert Farrar Capon is the author of numerous books on theology, cooking, family life, and, sometimes, a combination of the three. His works include Between Noon and Three; Kingdom, Grace, Judgement; and Genesis: The Movie. An Episcopal priest, Capon is the father of six children and two stepchildren, and lives on Shelter Island, New York. In Consideration of the Cookbook Don’t get me wrong; I love cookbooks. But they are a hollow medium. At its core, a cookbook is an instruction manual—many more pretty pictures, but an instruction manual nonetheless. A successful… Read More →

Film Review: Looper

Looper written and directed by Rian Johnson (DMG Entertainment, Endgame Entertainment, and FilmDistrict, R, 118 minutes) Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Bruce Willis, Emily Blunt, Paul Dano, and Jeff Daniels. Everyone’s Favorite Mind Bending Paradox Time travel. A mind bending paradox worthy of many late-night conversations. Setting aside plausibility, there seems to be two competing views on the subject. One, made famous by the Ashton Kutcher film, The Butterfly Effect, posits that altering small aspects of the past—as little as harming a butterfly—result in drastic changes to the present. The other suggests time travel carries no inherent danger to the present, think Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. If you travel back in time and alter the past, that altered past… Read More →