Book Review: Justification

Justification: God’s Plan & Paul’s Vision by N.T. Wright (Downers Grove: IVP Academic, 2009. 279 pp) N.T. Wright studied at Sedbergh School and Exeter College before being ordained as a Junior Research Fellow at Merton College. Wright taught at Cambridge, McGill, and Oxford University before becoming the Bishop of Durham. Recently, he took a position as a Chair in New Testament and Early Christianity at the University of St. Andrews. There are times when I wish I lived during the era of saints and heretics. As orthodox Christianity developed, people fought over differing theological positions and often resorted to name calling. It is best to view N.T. Wright’s book in a similar fashion. In short, Justification reads as an extended… Read More →

Book Review: Soccernomics

Soccernomics: Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey–and Even Iraq–Are Destined to Become the Kings of the World’s Most Popular Sport By Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski (New York: Nation Books, 2009. 328 pp) Simon Kuper writes weekly sports columns for the Financial Times. Of his many books written on soccer from an anthropological perspective, Kuper’sSoccer Against the Enemy won the William Hill Prize for sports book of the year. Kuper lives in Paris with his wife and daughter. Stefan Szymanski is a professor of economics and the director of Sports Network Research Center at Cass Business School in London. He has published many articles on the business of sport with a… Read More →

Book Review: The Imperfectionists

The Imperfectionists: A Novel by Tom Rachman. (New York: The Dial Press, 2010. 272 pp) Tom Rachman studied at the University of Toronto and Columbia University. Tom worked as an editor and reporter for the Associated Press before moving to Paris to take a job as an editor for the International Herald Tribune. He now lives in Rome. There are times when the setting of a story carries such strength that it acts as a central character in a plot. The Island demonstrates this role for fans of the hit television series, Lost, because they recognize the centrality of this setting in an encapsulating story about characters. In a similar manner, Rachman’s debut novel, The Imperfectionists, portrays – through the… Read More →