Book Review: Goodbye, Vitamin

Goodbye, Vitamin, by Rachel Khong.

Goodbye, Vitamin: A Novel by Rachel Khong (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2017. 208 pp) Rachel Khong grew up in Southern California and holds degrees from Yale University and the University of Florida. From 2011 to 2016, she was the managing editor then executive editor of Lucky Peach magazine. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, Joyland, American Short Fiction, the San Francisco Chronicle, The Believer, and California Sunday. She lives in San Francisco. The Bowl of Mixed Nuts It all started with a pill in the mixed nuts. For years, the one rule by which we lived centered on how my grandparents would bestow gastrologic riches upon visiting family. Good food for breakfast, lunch, and dinner…. Read More →

Properly Introduced: “Train Juju”

Iowa Review 47 1

“Train Juju” by Iheoma Nwachukwu in The Iowa Review 47/1 “Presently, he reassembled his family. It made Corporal Nwafanim happy. His three sons, aged five, seven, and eight, returned as he had wished. More importantly, his wife came, too. Where before, when he got off work, he had sat in harsh silence in the scratched armchair, closing his eyes to relive the firm weight of his mother’s breast in his mouth at age seven, or, at other times, slowly pitching back and forth in the seat as he watched the jerk of the clay lamp’s flame on the bare table, now there were the squabbling cries of his little boys to sweeten his evenings.”

Book Review: Pigeon English

Pigeon English by Stephen Kelman

Pigeon English: A Novel by Stephen Kelman (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011. 288 pp) Stephen Kelman was born in Luton in 1976. Pigeon English, his first novel, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Desmond Elliot Prize, and the Guardian First Book Award. He lives in St. Albans. Existential Fears of Parenthood There’s a list of Oscar-nominated films piling up in the queue. The reasons are many. We work; we try to make dinner; scarcely a minute passes without the air molecules punctured from another exhort: “Daddy! Daddy! Daddy! Look at me!” Down the list of reasons for which we tend not to watch movies exists a fear. Put differently, many films place children in perilous circumstances. While such… Read More →

Television Show Review: Preacher: Season 2

Preacher Season 2

Preacher: Season 2 created by Sam Catlin, Evan Goldberg, and Seth Rogen (AMC, Short Drive Entertainment, Point Grey Pictures, Original Film) Starring Dominic Cooper, Joseph Gilgun, Ruth Negga, Ian Colletti, Graham McTavish, Pip Torrens, Noah Taylor, Julie Ann Emery, Tom Brooke, and Ronald Guttman. *Spoilers for Previous Seasons* Beauty and Meaning Style and substance = nirvana. You need them both for perfection. Thinking about plotting, it seems so easy to see how writers picture an ending and organize story toward that end. Problematically, if someone isn’t involved in the main storyline, acting contracts and financial arrangements demand involvement. So, key characters enter side quests to keep them busy and more importantly for the actor, on the screen. Only until the… Read More →

Film Review: American Honey

American Honey

American Honey written and directed by Andrea Arnold (A24, Parts and Labor, British Film Institute, Film4, R, 163 min) Starring Sasha Lane, Shia LaBeouf, Riley Keough, McCaul Lombardi, Arielle Holmes, Crystal Ice, Veronica Ezell, Chad Cox, Garry Howell, Kenneth Kory Tucker, Raymond Coalson, Isaiah Stone, and Dakota Powers. A Suburbanite’s Dance with Poverty My closest dance with poverty waltzed through my life in my early twenties. Mind you, poverty in the most white, suburbanized approach to the word. Even during my lowest earning periods, parents possessed a knack for encouraging currency toward my empty coffers, let alone the fail-safe of an exhibit-quality room waiting for me were I ever to require lodging again (I did). As such, the suburban white… Read More →