Television Show Review: Chef’s Table

Chef's Table

Chef’s Table created by David Gelb (Boardwalk Pictures, City Room Creative) Starring Dan Barber, Massimo Bottura, Francis Mallman, Niki Nkayama, Magnus Nilsson, and Ben Shewry. Getting Philosophical Upon entry to my preferred academic institution, my parents provided ample pressure to study business. I understand the position. What is college if not a place to earn a degree to set yourself up for consistent success? Unfortunately, my passions—at the time—orbited separate academic pursuits. Even though I have a passion for business, my reasoning for avoiding its study remains consistent. The study of business, at its core, is a normative practice. It tells you what to do and what not to do; if you can master the complicated functions, you have the… Read More →

Book Review: The Whispering Muse

The Whispering Muse by Sjon

The Whispering Muse: A Novel by Sjón; translated by Victoria Cribb (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012; originally published in 2005. 160 pp) Born in Reykjavik in 1962, Sjón is an acclaimed Icelandic novelist. He won the Nordic Council’s Literary Prize for The Blue Fox. His Latest novel, Moonstone—The Boy Who Never Was was awarded the 2013 Icelandic Literary Prize. A poet, librettist, and lyricist, Sjón has worked with Björk. He is the president of the Icelandic PEN Centre and former chairman of the board of Reykjavik, UNESCO city of Literature. Victoria Cribb lived in Iceland for a number of years, working as a translator, journalist, and publisher. She has translated the works of Sjón, Gyrδir Elíasson, and Arnaldur… Read More →

Film Review: Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Jiro Dreams of Sushi directed by David Gelb (Preferred Content and Sundial Pictures, PG, 81 minutes) Starring Jiro Ono and Yoshikazu Ono. Talent or Hard Work? What makes a successful person? It seems as if “born with it” is a common perception. We see unmatched athleticism in sports, celeritous musicianship, or a brilliant thesis, and we praise the talent behind such work. But do people rise to the highest levels of their profession on talent alone? I’m not convinced. As the great Seattle poet, Macklemore, proclaims in “Ten Thousand Hours”: “You see I study art / The greats weren’t great because at birth they could paint / The greats were great cause they paint a lot”. As Macklemore implies, success… Read More →

Book Review: The Supper of the Lamb

The Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection by Robert Farrar Capon; edited by Ruth Reichl (New York: The Modern Library, 2002; originally published in 1967. 320 pp) Robert Farrar Capon is the author of numerous books on theology, cooking, family life, and, sometimes, a combination of the three. His works include Between Noon and Three; Kingdom, Grace, Judgement; and Genesis: The Movie. An Episcopal priest, Capon is the father of six children and two stepchildren, and lives on Shelter Island, New York. In Consideration of the Cookbook Don’t get me wrong; I love cookbooks. But they are a hollow medium. At its core, a cookbook is an instruction manual—many more pretty pictures, but an instruction manual nonetheless. A successful… Read More →

Book Review: The Nasty Bits

The Nasty Bits: Collected Varietal Cuts, Usable Trim, Scraps, and Bones (New York, Bloombury Publishing, 2006. 288 pp) Anthony Bourdain, born in 1956, attended Vassar College and graduated from the Culinary Institute of America. He has worked as a cook and chef in many institutions strewn across the New York City map. Bourdain contributes articles to the Times, New York Times, Observer, the Face, Scotland on Sunday, and Food Arts Magazine. An addition to Kitchen Confidential, he has written two crime novels – Gone Bamboo and Bone in the Throat. Bourdain was the executive chef at Brassiere Les Halles and is currently the host of the Travel Channel program: Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations. Bourdain resides in New York City. The Final Tour As Anthony Bourdain, traveler, culinary icon, author, and chef enters his last season of the television show No… Read More →