Book Review: Doughnut Economics

Doughnut Economics by Kate Raworth

Doughnut Economics: 7 Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist by Kate Raworth (White River Junction: Chelsea Green Publishing, 2017. 320 pp) Kate Raworth is an economist that teaches at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute. She has a BA in politics, philosophy, and economics, and an MSc in economics for development, both from Oxford University. Whiteboarding Within the rhythms of my current role, I meet daily with my fellow team members to strategize and create deliverables for our clients. These working sessions often involve whiteboarding our ideas. Having a handful of completed projects under the belt, I’ve come to see how valuable that whiteboard becomes when a group of people are trying to solve a problem. It’s true, a… Read More →

Top 40 Albums of 2016

40. Happiness Is not a Place by The Wind and the Wave Catchy and upbeat folk rock.   39. Stay Gold by the Butch Walker A reincarnation of the boss. Pure rock ‘n’ roll.   38. Max Jury by Max Jury Reserved and introspective. A solid voice, soft but powerful.   37. Therapy Session by NF Christian hip-hop from the dark side. 36. Ouroboros by Ray LaMontagne Ray LaMontagne continues his quest to be a classic-rock star.   35. Hymns by Bloc Party Bloc Party adds an organ to their sound and questions of faith to their lyrics.   34. A/B by Kaleo In the spirit of all Icelandic music, Kaleo plays music against beautiful backdrops. The band also has the blues.   33. The Ride by Catfish and the Bottlemen The 2016 nominee for Oasis impersonation…. Read More →

Television Show Review: Making a Murderer

Making a Murderer

Making a Murderer created by Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos (Synthesis Films, Netflix) Starring Steven Avery. Behind Bars I haven’t spent much of my waking tine daydreaming about what it would be like to live my life behind bars. Prison remains an ethereal concept. I know “bad” people are there; I realize a disproportionate number of inmates emerge from low socio-economic status. In truth, I don’t proceed on a daily basis with any level of fear about breaking the law and the corresponding need to do time. Aside from a riveting story of true crime, Making a Murderer renders me apart because of the way it portrays systemic issues in the judicial system that can lead to broken outcomes seeped… Read More →

Television Show Review: Show Me a Hero

Show Me a Hero

Show Me a Hero written by David Simon and directed by Paul Haggis (Blown Deadline Productions, Pretty Pictures, Home Box Office) Starring Oscar Isaac, Carla Quevedo, Alfred Molina, Ilfenesh Hadera, Natalie Paul, Peter Riegert, Jon Bernthal, Winona Ryder, and Brianna Horne. Literary Quotes “Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.” —F. Scott Fitzgerald The path of righteousness is a lonely road. The right side of history does not often equate with the populace. When a hero takes a stand, you better bet she’ll face opposition. It’s the nature of the beast. Even more interesting are the people whose leadership emerges in shades of gray. Taking a stand occurs as a matter of convenience, or as the best… Read More →

Film Review: Bernie

Bernie written and directed by Richard Linklater (Castle Rock Entertainment, Collins House Productions, Deep Freeze Productions, PG-13, 104 min) Starring Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine, and Matthew McConaughey. Justice and Utility If an action resulted in the happiness of an entire community, you would support it, right? Stated as an ethical position, this idea is utilitarianism. Utilitarianism suggests the greatest amount of good for the greatest amount of people. If someone commits a crime, they have negatively affected others. Thus, the greatest good is to punish them for the benefit of others. But what if everyone likes the person who did the wrong? Should justice be distributed by order of how much we like the defendant? Most often, people don’t need… Read More →

Book Discussion: The Round House

The Round House by Louise Erdrich (New York: HarperCollins, 2012. 326 pp) Louise Erdrich lives with her family in Minnesota and is the owner of Birchbark Books, an independent bookstore. She is also the bestselling author of many critically acclaimed novels for adults, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Plague of Doves and the National Book Award finalist The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse. She is also the author of the picture book Grandmother’s Pigeon, illustrated by Jim LaMarche. A Crime, Unspeakable In the spring of 1988, a woman named Geraldine, who is living on a Native American reservation in North Dakota, is attacked. Her husband, Bazil, and son, Joe, find her in a car drenched… Read More →