Book Review: Fresh Complaint

Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides

Fresh Complaint: Stories by Jeffrey Eugenides (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017. 304 pp) Born in Detroit, Michigan on March 8, 1960, Jeffrey Eugenides is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and short story writer. As an undergraduate, he attended Brown University and later earned an M.A. in Creative Writing from Stanford University. Eugenides received the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Fellowship for a short story he wrote in 1986. In 2002, his novel, Middlesex, won the Pulitzer Prize and the Ambassador Book Award. Eugenides works on faculty at Princeton University’s Program in Creative writing and lives in New Jersey with his wife and daughter. The Knot in Your Stomach A signal of life, outside of biological factors such… Read More →

Book Review: Execution

Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done by Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan (New York: Crown Publishing, 2009 Revised Edition. 320 pp) Larry Bossidy earned a B.A. in Economics from Colgate University. He began working at General Electric in 1957 and worked his way up the corporate ladder finally securing Vice Chairman in 1984. He has also served as Chairman and CEO of AlliedSignal and Honeywell Corporation. An author, consultant, and scholar, Ram Charan has consulted with companies such as GE, KLM, and Bank of America. He has taught at Harvard Business School, the Kellogg School of Management, and Boston University. The Academy and the Company Having experienced this phenomenon over the last year or so, I can safely attest… Read More →

Film Review: Looper

Looper written and directed by Rian Johnson (DMG Entertainment, Endgame Entertainment, and FilmDistrict, R, 118 minutes) Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Bruce Willis, Emily Blunt, Paul Dano, and Jeff Daniels. Everyone’s Favorite Mind Bending Paradox Time travel. A mind bending paradox worthy of many late-night conversations. Setting aside plausibility, there seems to be two competing views on the subject. One, made famous by the Ashton Kutcher film, The Butterfly Effect, posits that altering small aspects of the past—as little as harming a butterfly—result in drastic changes to the present. The other suggests time travel carries no inherent danger to the present, think Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. If you travel back in time and alter the past, that altered past… Read More →